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What are the issues relating to regulation, censorship, morals and ethics within advertising?

When company’s are approach their advertising they have to be incredibly careful how they design them. The reason or this is that the adverts they are making are to be broadcasted to a sizeable audience, even if the advert is only broadcast in one specific country, nowadays it will also be on the internet were it can be accessed by anyone from around the world at any time. This means that the type of people that are viewing the advert will be from different countries, races, religions, beliefs and sensibilities so the adverts produced must be tailored to as universal and audience as possible so as to avoid offence of particular groups. Bad PR ( public relations) can ruin a company’s hard earned reputation, which could lead to drastically reduced sales of their products.

Banded Tango Advert

In 1991 Tango released and advert that ended up banned from television. Featuring a group of three men standing in the street whilst one was drinking a can of Tango, voiced over by two different commentators, narrating in the style of football match commentators. A bright orange man suddenly runs out onto the street and up to the man drinking the Tango before proceeding with two hands to slap the man on either side of his head. Cutting to a close up of the shocked man’s face, The slogan then reads “you know when you have been Tangoed”. This advert was banned shortly after being released due to the receipt of a number of complaints about children copying the advert and running up to each other and ‘Tangoing’ each other, in some cases this actually caused physical injury such as perforated ear drums.

Upon the rapid retraction of the advert, Tango then replaced it with a advert filmed and eddied in the exact same way as the previous one, except instead of a slap the orange man kisses him with his hand over his mouth. ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8nQyPNuA5I

This advert is definitely a prime example of why when advertising, companies need to be so careful in thinking through their ideas, because it only takes a few people out of audience of hundreds of millions to (in the case of the Tango advert Copy something they have seen) or take offence to one thing in an advert and the whole campaign can fail, which in turn will be a huge financial setback for the company because they will have spent millions of pounds on promoting it only to have to retract it.

Information Sourced from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tango_(drink)

Banned advert: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kji8qIo8h4I

The remake: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8nQyPNuA5I

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Our Primary Ad Ideas

Boner B Gone

Boner B gone is an anti-erection drug designed to rid of unwanted erections, essentially the opposite of Viagra. After discussion, we decided to make a series of 5 shorter adverts based on men at different stages in life and different careers in order to appeal to wider demographic. The 5 different characters in the adverts will be a High school student, university student, a businessman, an athlete and an average Joe / possibly patient at the doctors and a musician.

High school student: We have a classroom setting during an oral presentation session. There is a student sat in his chair just be fore he goes up to give his presentation and he gets a random boner. He starts to panic and we cut to a presenter giving a voice over and explaining a little bit about the product and handing the guy some Boner B gone, which he takes and goes up to the guy and gives it to him. After taking it, we cut to a shot of him just finishing the presentation to roaring applause from the class. “Boner B gone”

University Student: We open up to a party scene and the guy is dancing with a girl. Things get a little bit steamier and the guy gets a boner and it won’t go down. He starts dancing in an awkward manner, trying to conceal it when the presenter come in and gives him the Boner B Gone, he uses it and he dances with the girl normally again (maybe she leads him out of the room.

Athlete: This guy is lifting weights at the gym, and checking out a sexy girl working out nearby. She starts looking at him checking him out and he starts showing off to her and she starts giggling at him as he realises he has an erection. The scene pauses and then rewinds, playing though again with him taking the Boner B Gone and then getting the girls number.

Average Joe: There is a guy on a date in a coffee shop, he buys some coffee and they sit down at a table. He and his date are talking and she reaches across the table and accidentally spills coffee on his lap, she freaks out grabbing a bunch of napkins and vigorously rubbing his lap to try and dry it off not realising. His eyes widen and he gets a boner and it gets awkward, as they lock eyes.

Shoe shop: Dude walks in to the shoe store and says hello to the people working there before proceeding to look around at the shoes. He asks to try on a pair and the woman brings some out. He puts the on and starts checking them out in the more Part 2 He locks eyes with the chick, slow mo. He drops the shoe but it doesn’t hit the ground. She looks down and sees it’s dangling from his boner.

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  • 1 month ago

Details Make The Difference

This is a cool little ad for the new Sony Experia Z smartphone. I like the idea behind this advert as it praises drawing inspiration from the world around you and collaborating with others to make something new and beautiful in its own right. Everything is a remix, and the ballet performance at the end is no exception. The soundtrack to this ad is an edgy Michael Jackson song which is a combination of both classical instruments and melodies mashed up with a very funky, hip hop/R&B beat. The juxtaposition of the two different styles of music is not only very edgy, fresh and cool, but a audible representation of the events that occur in the video i.e the fusion of the hip hop dancers flow with the medium of contemporary dance to create something new and edgy.

Now before getting carried away by all the dance and music, this is a mobile phone advert and looking at it everything going on in the ad is a reflection of the phone, a piece of technology formed by collaborators drawing inspiration from different sources. The phone has very sleek, sharp, distinct edges which tie in with the edgy nature of the ad, not to mention the vivd display as expressive as the coloured sheets used in the final performance.

Various other features of the phone are displayed throughout the ad, for example the video capabilities of the device, the fact it’s waterproof and it makes a great personal mp3 player and it’s sleek design and large screen size are also shown off during the commercial.

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POPCORN!

Popcorn is a great little documentary I came across on vimeo. It takes a subject familiar to most, breaks it down, explains it and gives us a detailed yet concise history of the subject with the help of a few Graphic animations. I really like the simple, straight forward nature of this short documentary. It’s well paced, well shot and well narrated with good use of audio for the soundtrack, foley and voice over.

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Movie Hecklers

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Guardians of the Galaxy

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How Do Adverts Get Their Point Across?

As with a lot of film, adverts are a lot more complex than people think. Here are a few ways adverts get their message across.

• What makes this product look appealing? - i.e. clothes, the styling, colour, size, fit and whom they are being modelled on all make a big impact on how the audience receive the ad.

Market research is an absolute necessity when creating any advert. In order to sell a product, you need to know who will buy it, what age range the product will attract, the social and shopping habits of those in the target demographic as well as hobbies, and behavioural/spending habits in order to know how to advertise to them.

Now different companies go about advertising their products in different ways. For example some will use sex to sell their products by placing a scantily clad model next to or in their product i.e. Victoria’s secret and Calvin Klein’s men’s underwear range. Others will try to sell you a feeling they want you to associate with their product i.e. Herbal essence shampoo using selling the feeling of pleasure from using their shampoo, Cadbury’s trying to sell joy with their chocolate or KFC who try to sell feeling of family and the joy of sharing chicken with their food. 

In a more modern trend, some companies try to sell us mindsets, ideas, concepts and ideologies with their products. Some key examples of this would be Nike, Adidas, Apple and Facebook. 

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In both Nike and Adidas’ cases, they both are selling ideologies with their products with extremely catchy tag lines that drive the whole concept on. Tag lines like Just Do It’ and 'impossible is nothing’ are designed to sell more than just footwear and sports attire. They are selling a mindset with their brands, saying if you by our running shoe’s you can look at that race and 'Just do it' because you have all you need in our gear. You can train harder, run faster, jump higher, swim deeper and perform better, with our products 'Impossible is Nothing.' They market to their target audiences by creating both inspiring and visually well put together adverts of pro athlete’s stories/advice, or portraying the people the audience wants to be to make the relate to the advertising even more.

Location is also another important factor when designing an advert because it can make or break an advert if the locations are off. The production team need to consider what it is they’re advertising, what locations would compliment the product the most, whether they’ll shoot on a constructed set, outdoors, abroad or in a public area. Public areas are of course the go to for viral advertising especially using flash mobs or elaborate stunts.

Brand identity is very important when it comes to advertising because people like what’s familiar, and they’re more likely to buy products from a brand they know and trust than an unknown brand with no real credibility in their eyes. This is why good advertising is imperative, to become a household name, one must produce high quality, creative and memorable adverts to make people know who they are.

Celebrity endorsement is also key to the advertising process, because it again draws on the familiarity of the audience with the celebrity and also borrows some of the celebrity’s credibility to support their product. this can sometimes back fire if said celebrity is involved in some sort of scandal and the brand takes bad PR by association for example Nike and Tiger woods. A lot of top pain celebs make vast quantities of money from endorsement deals i.e. David Beckham with samsung, the paid him a lot of money to publicly praise their brand along with receiving free gear including one of their flagship smartphones. The catch for this particular endorsement deal however was, he’s not allowed to be seen using any other phone than a samsung phone i.e. he couldn’t be papped using an iPhone or windows phone because they are in competition with samsung.

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How do Adverts get their point across? (cont)

On average in the United Kingdom, a programme that is approximately an hour long will in fact be one third commercials. Judging by this statistic, if you turn on your television you will more than likely see multiple advertisements every fifteen minutes for a 6 minute period on average. As an advertiser, one thing that you must ask yourself when producing a commercial is, how could I clearly get the message from this advert across and stand out to the viewers in as short a time as possible?


The first thing that should come to mind before starting production is making the commercial relatable to the target audience. Your advert is showing them something that will fulfil a need or desire in their lives, calling out to their wants. By showing the audience a relatable issue your ad should then prompt them to buy your product as the solution to this issue. To do this you first need to identify and understand your target audience, through market research via various streams and monitoring social networks, you can know what media they like/dislike (TV shows, radio, films), where they like to eat, what they wear and what their interested in and generally how much money they like to spend. knowing things like what paper they read can help you to understand them from a political viewpoint as much as knowing what kind of clothes they like can help you present them with adverts specific to them. Your ads should feature situations they can relate to, people who look and act like them, and realistic and desirable outcomes.

As proven from previous advertisements, our attention is drawn more towards something that is visually pleasurable or attractive (SEX SELLS). The second thing you must incorporate into your ad is making them pleasing to the eye. A lot of ads use this technique for the same reason (using models, scenery, music), often pairing the model and product to create a good feeling about the advert. Despite this seemingly obvious point, what constitutes a pleasant? Beauty is subjective, so as an advertiser, you will have to (again) research your target audience. Humour is also used to try and make people enjoy an advert more, but different audiences find different things funny so again, know your target market.


As previously stated, adverts take up almost twenty minutes of a one hour show, so you can expect a lot of similar themes between different ads. To make your advert catch peoples eye it must be different to anything they have seen before, a novelty to them. Due to the high number of ads these days this can be very hard to do, so you must have an original idea that surprises people.


The last element you must add to your commercial to make it successful is not actually part of the commercial itself, but instead the timing. If your product is targeting an adult, you would be unlikely to advertise it in the middle of the day when they are most likely to be at work, you would instead play it around evening time when they are at home. The same goes for whatever audience you are targeting at, you must time the advert to suit the time of day they would be most likely to be watching.

An example of targeting specific markets are as follows:

On channels such as the disney channel, cartoon network and nickelodeon, you will find many adverts for toys and other kids shows as well as video games but you wouldn’t see car insurance adverts, beer or anti ageing cream being advertised on these channels because the demographic watching these channels is all wrong.

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In 2007 a child got salmonella poisoning after eating a Cadbury’s chocolate bar, creating a really bad stigma on Cadbury’s as a company and therefore lost them a lot of their fan base and trusted consumers. As a result of this, they decided to make an advert that was catchy, entertaining and fresh. The idea was to use this viral advert to improve sales and regain trust from their costumers.

They did this by creating the iconic Cadbury’s gorilla advert. They use close up facial shots of the Gorilla which draws the audience in with it’s realistic nature and the suspense built by the music. The music, which is “In the air tonight” by Phil Collins, has a familiar feel to the audience with it’s being a very famous record from the 80s. The song its self was written in 1979 and recorded in 1980. Released as a single in the United Kingdom in January 1981. An instant hit, the song quickly climbed to number 2 in the UK charts. The track still to this day remains as one of Phil Collin’s best known hit singles and a timeless classic. Instantly recognisable, the majority of the audience (20+) knew the song as it was such a hit, the advert was now introducing it to the younger generation, reintroducing it to the mainstream media and allowing both young and old to enjoy.  

Cadbury’s signature colour is purple which they have incorporated on the key wall of the studio in which this advert has been set. Purple is a very safe, neutral colour and can also be vibrant and fun. Purple is also a significant part of cadbury’s brand identity and a lot of people when they see the colour instantly associate it with Cadbury’s. This advert further builds the connection between the company and the colour as people will associate the gorilla with the background and think Cadbury’s. I personally am reminded of the advert every time I see a gorilla now! The main campaign for Cadburys is “Joy” which they use this word a lot on there website. This will appeal to the audience suggesting that there adverts and there chocolate will make you smile and feel happy and joyful. Their Tagline “a glass half full” further reinforces the the positive outlook and feelings with which they want to associate themselves.

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In August 2008  an advert was aired, directed by Tim Van Someren and watched by over 2.2 million people showing that the audacity and risk taking, payed off. The advert only cost £500,000 altogether and made history at the same time. In this advert Honda carried out the worlds first live TV ad on Channel 4, where a team of Elite skydivers from two aeroplanes jumped out and spelt out Honda in a sequence under the three minute time limit to advertise the new Honda Accord.

Honda were extremely brave to do this on live television as there are many complications with live broadcasting, let lone the nature of the stunt they were attempting. Due to the difficulty of why they were trying to achieve, there was only a 50/50 chance that it would go as planned. Honda could of either humiliated themselves by the advert going wrong or impressed the viewers if it went right. By doing this advert I feel that Honda proved tenacity and quality of their brand. Their confidence in taking such a huge risk doing this advert advert most definitely payed off.

When Honda’s new car the Honda Accord launched in May 2013, they were up against the Audi’s A4 and the BMW’s 3 series. Honda did their research and found desirability to be most influential factor of sales for this car type. This presented a problem, and it was the fact that Hondas cars were renowned for their reliability not desirability, so Honda had to make their new Accord appeal to the heart and not the head. The target audience was late 30s VW Golf/Audi A3 owners, who were driven, ambitious and hard working to obtain the things they wanted.

Creative Execution
The Honda philosophy is ‘Difficult is Worth Doing’ (DIWD), therefore the media strategy had to deliver the brand philosophy in two ways:


1. Challenge the Audience – seed DIWD concept several weeks before the car was available in dealerships.


2. Reward the Audience – through an emotional pay-off for their hard work in the seeding stage.

kicking off with a series of unbranded communications to launch the concept of DIWD though large format outdoor ads, cryptic TV spots and optimised search engine results driving the audience to the DIWD blog with a diary of a skydive. Unbranded print and TV ads, with skydiving cues, alluded to an event taking place on TV at 8.10pm, during the week of the event. The reward came with, the world’s first ever 3-minute live ad featuring an 18 strong skydive team spelling H,O,N,D and A, in sequence, demonstrating the philosophy behind the new Accord – ‘Difficult is Worth Doing’. 

By doing this advert, Honda increased the desirability of their new Accord by a huge 38 points, more than double that of the clients target. over 200,000 extra viewers tuned into see the advert, with over £2m of PR was generated during the campaign, more people desired the new Accord and over £1 million in sales was generated over a single weekend.

 http://thisisnotadvertising.wordpress.com/2011/07/07/honda-accord-live-ad-difficult-is-worth-doing/ -(assessed-29/1/14)

http://www.theguardian.com/media/organgrinder/2008/may/30/hondaslivetvadaprstunto (assessed-29/1/2014)

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